Instructions: Print this exam worksheet. Return to the course page using the link below. Read the course material. Enter your answers on this worksheet. Return to the course page and click the link 'Take Test.' Transfer your answers.

https://www.quantumunitsed.com/go/713

Quantum Units Education

Complexities of Non-Custodial Fathering for Low Income Individuals

Executive Summary

1. Some fathers struggle to maintain positive involvement with their children because of:

A. Unemployment and difficulties providing financial support.

B. The dissolution of their romantic relationships with the mothers of their children.

C. Incarceration.

D. All of the above.


2. The motivation of fathers to be an active force in their children’s lives sometimes stemmed from their desire to compensate for the absence of their own fathers, or for the neglectful, traumatic, and sometimes abusive early experiences they had suffered themselves.

A. True

B. False


3. Which of the following is the one common factor across the majority of men that make it difficult for them to fully become the parents they want to be for their children?

A. They are incarcerated during their child’s youth.

B. Their own troubled childhoods and lack of positive family role models.

C. They must take paid work in areas other than where their child lives.

D. All of the above.


4. Which of the following is the most common barrier fathers cited for their continued involvement with their children?

A. Their ongoing contentious relationships with the mother of their children.

B. They are incarcerated during their child’s youth.

C. Their own troubled childhoods and lack of positive family role models.

D. All of the above.


5. Spells of incarceration often limited fathers’ physical access at critical points in their children’s early life course, and past felonies sharply limited men’s employment opportunities and their ability to secure housing.

A. True

B. False


6. Even working fathers had difficulty making ends meet for which of the following reasons?

A. They could find only low-wage jobs.

B. They often had only limited hours.

C. They managed to land only temporary work.

D. All of the above.


7. The prevalence of fathers’ volatile relationships with the mothers of their children suggests the need for co-parenting services to emphasize strategies for which of the following?

A. Anger management

B. Positive communication skills

C. Conflict resolution

D. All of the above


8. Although fathers faced a myriad of barriers to gaining and maintaining employment, the most commonly cited obstacle was:

A. Having a disability that made it difficult to do most jobs they were qualified for.

B. Not having an education or skill that most jobs require.

C. Their past incarceration and criminal records.

D. All of the above.


Introduction

9. Nonresident fathers tend to be more economically vulnerable than other men and are more likely to be all of the following, except:

A. Educated beyond a high-school degree.

B. African American or Hispanic.

C. Unemployed.

D. Nonresident fathers tend to be more likely than other men for all of the above.


10. The involvement and support of fathers can affect lifelong outcomes for children such as all of the following, except:

A. Educational attainment

B. Mental health

C. Employment

D. Childbearing


Overview of Fathers in the PACT Qualitative Study

11. Because of their nonresident status, almost two-thirds of fathers had no contact with one or more of their children.

A. True

B. False


12. The most complex family network, claimed by about _____% of fathers, included a father with four or more children by four or more partners.

A. 5

B. 10

C. 15

D. 20


13. The fathers living with a child tended to be younger and more likely to be employed than other fathers in the study.

A. True

B. False


“It’s All About the Kids” - The Meaning of Fatherhood

14. The men interviewed often see children as a catalyst for changing their own life course in which of the following ways?

A. Exiting gangs

B. Trading crime for conventional employment

C. Leaving substance abuse behind

D. All of the above


15. Upon becoming a parent, many men came to the realization that they were no longer living just for themselves.

A. True

B. False


16. Fathers who failed to provide financially for their children often felt they were falling short of what fatherhood, and manhood, required.

A. True

B. False


17. Many men noted feeling a greater sense of accountability, and for some this was a force powerful enough to turn them away from a lifestyle of street crime and substance abuse.

A. True

B. False


18. About 95% of the fathers said that fatherhood pulled them away from activities that could have put them at risk of death or incarceration.

A. True

B. False


19. “Slowing down” was usually explicitly motivated by:

A. A desire to play a significant role in their children’s lives.

B. Not wanting to go to prison.

C. A fear that their current life was going to lead to their death.

D. All of the above.


20. Some who had been drug dealers claimed that becoming a father provided an acceptable excuse for exiting “the drug community” - a decision that would otherwise have put them in danger.

A. True

B. False


21. When asked what it meant to be a good father, men returned regularly in their narratives to the significance of:

A. Spending time with their children.

B. Providing financially for their children.

C. Being a positive role model for their children.

D. All of the above.


22. The men who were not currently providing for their children did not recognize that providing was something a “good dad” does.

A. True

B. False


23. Talking about the role that fathers should play in the lives of their children, the men touched on all of the following main aspects of fatherhood, except for:

A. Steering on the right path

B. Being present

C. Being a financial provider

D. All of the above were main aspects of fatherhood


24. Nearly three in four fathers described how “just being there” for their children was a core part of responsible fatherhood.

A. True

B. False


25. “Being there” consisted of opportunities to spend time with their children - being physically and emotionally there for them - but was less important than supporting their children financially.

A. True

B. False


26. Which of the following was the primary way that fathers were involved with their children?

A. Play activities

B. Eating together

C. Going to church

D. Visiting extended family


27. For many fathers, not being absent was a hallmark feature of what a father is supposed to do.

A. True

B. False


28. No matter their own trajectories as adults, the one common factor across the majority of men that made it difficult for them to fully become the parents they wanted to be for their children was:

A. Their ongoing contentious relationships with the mother of their children.

B. Their own troubled childhoods and lack of positive family role models.

C. Being incarcerated during their child’s youth.

D. All of the above.


“It Was Rough” - Unstable Family Lives During Childhood

29. The most common motivation driving the men in the study to be an active father in their children’s lives is:

A. The recollection of their own childhoods.

B. To be able to prevent their child from making the same mistakes they made.

C. The belief that a real father provides for their children.

D. All of the above.


30. Most of the fathers interviewed had experienced “father absence” as children.

A. True

B. False


31. For some men, their mother’s husbands or boyfriends:

A. Served as a father figure.

B. Helped them in their transition to manhood.

C. Affirmed through example the importance of providing for one’s family.

D. All of the above.


32. Stepfathers sometimes exposed the men early in their lives to alcohol and drug use, which often tied to abusive behaviors.

A. True

B. False


33. Men attributed their early exposure to violence, drugs, and strife from fathers and father figures as an explanation for exhibiting opposite behaviors in their own lives.

A. True

B. False


34. Men generally cast their relationships with their own mothers in a far more negative light than their relationships with their fathers.

A. True

B. False


35. Many men characterized their mothers as:

A. Off doing their own thing with other men, leaving them alone or with siblings.

B. Hardworking and strong figures who were primarily responsible for raising them.

C. Addicted to drugs and alcohol and didn’t properly care for them.

D. None of the above.


36. Extended family members sometimes stepped in to provide financial and emotional support or opened their homes to these fathers when they were growing up, often in response to:

A. Family conflict

B. Abusive situations

C. Drug and alcohol use by their parents

D. Any of the above


37. Fathers described their father figure male relatives as all of the following, except:

A. Teaching them about the tenants of manhood or fatherhood.

B. Underscoring the importance of work.

C. Rarely being there for them.

D. Giving them guidance about life.


38. Many fathers talked about getting involved in drugs and gangs around what age?

A. 8 or 9 years of age

B. 10 or 11 years of age

C. 12 or 13 years of age

D. 14 or 15 years of age


39. Sometimes fathers easily fell in with gangs and selling or using drugs because members of their family or household - fathers, stepfathers, mother’s current partners, siblings, uncles - were engaged in that lifestyle.

A. True

B. False


40. Men’s involvement in drugs and gangs during their youth often led to detrimental outcomes, such as:

A. Substance abuse

B. Violence

C. Jail time

D. All of the above


41. While street life was filled with dangers of its own kind, it also offered at least some fathers not only a source of income but also acceptance and belonging.

A. True

B. False


“She Makes It Really Hard To Be A Dad” - Relationships with the Mothers of Their Children

42. While in some instances conception caused tensions that continued after the child was born, more often conception solidified the partnership.

A. True

B. False


43. All of the following, according to the fathers’ own accounts, were commonly lacking in their relationship, except for:

A. Anger management

B. Intimate partner violence

C. Conflict resolution

D. Communication skills


44. For the men in the study, the primary barrier to fathers’ continued involvement with their children is:

A. The ongoing contentious relationship with the mothers of their children.

B. Their own troubled childhoods and lack of positive family role models.

C. Being incarcerated during their child’s youth.

D. All of the above.


45. “Gatekeeping” on the mothers’ part, both overt and subtle, is common.

A. True

B. False


46. According to the fathers, the young women who would become their children’s mothers were sometimes involved in a lifestyle with a high probability of unplanned pregnancies.

A. True

B. False


47. If the father was not in a stable relationship with the mother when an unplanned child was conceived, the couple often did not attempt to try to build, or rebuild, a relationship around the impending birth.

A. True

B. False


48. Most fathers had lived with the mothers of their children at least for some time.

A. True

B. False


49. Which of the following was common in the large majority of the relationships and was often directly implicated in the couple’s breakup?

A. Mistrust, especially surrounding issues of infidelity

B. Verbal aggression

C. Physical violence

D. All of the above


50. A few of the fathers avoided finding out if the child was theirs in order to:

A. Avoid having to take responsibility for the child.

B. Prevent problems in the relationship.

C. Both (A) and (B).

D. None of the above.


51. What percentage of the fathers acknowledged they had experienced some kind of intimate partner violence, either as victims or perpetrators or both?

A. 20%

B. 40%

C. 60%

D. 80%


52. When fathers described themselves as the perpetrator, they often cited which of the following as the cause?

A. Their exposure to witnessing physical and emotional abuse between their parent

B. Immaturity

C. Anger management issues

D. All of the above


53. The current quality of the parents’ relationship was often directly related to:

A. The father’s level of access to his children.

B. The amount of time the father had spent in jail / prison.

C. The amount of child support the father was paying.

D. The number of children the couple had together.


54. Fathers who had little to no contact with one or more of their children rarely strove to increased their involvement, whether in person or not.

A. True

B. False


55. Several fathers who reported complying with the formal child support orders claimed that their children’s mothers would sometimes restrict access when a father failed to provide “extras” over and above the required child support.

A. True

B. False


56. Most fathers attributed mothers’ gatekeeping behavior to the mothers’ desire to punish the fathers for past misdeeds, including:

A. Not paying child support.

B. Missing scheduled visits.

C. Breaking off the relationship.

D. Not being faithful when together.


“Life’s Hard” - Fathers’ Interwoven Personal Challenges

57. One in three fathers discussed in general terms past and present problems with all of the following, except:

A. Depression

B. Emotional instability

C. Bipolar disorder

D. Mental distress


58. Although the fathers faced a myriad of challenges, the most commonly cited barrier to employment was:

A. The fathers’ past incarceration

B. Low wages

C. Temporary work

D. Limited hours


59. When talking about their lack of success in obtaining employment, fathers typically focused on which of the following as factors that contributed to their difficulties finding employment?

A. Their lack of educational attainment.

B. Their lack of skills.

C. Their lack of employment history.

D. None of the above.


60. Based on the interviews with fathers about their current employment, the most common types of jobs currently or recently held were all of the following, except:

A. Food service

B. Construction

C. Farm work

D. Warehouse work


61. Which of the following were generally the housing option of last resort?

A. Living on the streets

B. Shelters

C. Living with family and friends

D. Doubling up


62. A felony conviction can render one ineligible for public housing and can make it impossible to move in with a partner or parent who lives in public housing, even if invited to do so.

A. True

B. False


63. One behavioral manifestation of mental and emotional distress was fathers’:

A. Anger management issues

B. Depression

C. Substance abuse

D. All of the above


64. About half of the fathers had health problems that were serious enough that they were receiving or applying for SSI/SSDI, including:

A. Traumatic brain injuries

B. Partial deafness

C. Severe arthritis

D. All of the above


“I’m A Better Father . . . I’m Taking the Steps that I Need” - Experiences in Responsible Fatherhood Programs

65. Fathers most often heard about the RF programs via:

A. Word of mouth, often from family members, friends, or acquaintances.

B. Social service agencies.

C. Direct outreach from the staff.

D. Both (B) and (C).


66. Almost two-thirds of fathers in the qualitative study said that the most important reason that they came to apply was:

A. To improve relationships with their child.

B. To improve relationships with their children’s mothers.

C. To improve their job situations.

D. None of the above.


67. Most fathers said that they enrolled in an RF program to improve their relationships with the mothers of their children due to the high prevalence of contentious relationships.

A. True

B. False


68. The large majority of participants described their case manager in which of the following ways?

A. A person they felt they could go to repeatedly.

B. As an “open door” to get help on a variety of issues.

C. Someone who supported them and cared about their well-being.

D. All of the above.


69. A few fathers, particularly older men, were disappointed that the program mainly referred clients to low-wage, entry-level, or temporary jobs.

A. True

B. False


70. A few fathers told interviewers that they were unable to utilize program legal services because they could not afford them, even at a reduced rate or sliding scale, while others said they made too much money to qualify.

A. True

B. False


Copyright © 2019 Quantum Units Education

Visit us at QuantumUnitsEd.com!