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Juvenile Sex Offenders

Unique Considerations Regarding Juveniles Who Commit Sexual Offenses

1. The juvenile court’s philosophy and goals are to hold youthful offenders accountable for their behavior while ensuring that they receive necessary guidance and appropriate therapeutic services.

A. True

B. False


2. Based on the scientific evidence, it is clear that juveniles and adults differ in all of the following ways, except for:

A. Propensity to engage in persistent criminal behavior, in that juveniles are more likely to continue to engage in such behavior.

B. Cognitive capabilities.

C. Capacity for self-management and regulation.

D. Susceptibility to social and peer pressure.


Etiology and Typologies of Juveniles Who Have Committed Sexual Offenses

3. Juveniles who have been sexually victimized are more likely to select sexual behaviors that are reflective of their own sexual victimization in regard to:

A. Age of the victim.

B. Gender of the victim.

C. Types of sexual behaviors perpetrated against the victim.

D. All of the above.


4. All of the following have been found to be predictive of subsequent sexual perpetration, except for:

A. An older age at time of sexual victimization.

B. A greater number of incidents.

C. A longer period of waiting to report the abuse.

D. A lower level of perceived family support after revelation of the abuse.


5. Adolescent sexual abusers tend to have similar rates of sexual victimization than nonsexually abusive youth.

A. True

B. False


6. The personality trait that contributes significantly to the social learning model is:

A. Submissive

B. Forceful

C. Both (A) and (B)

D. None of the above


7. Sexually victimized sexual abusers report experiencing significantly greater levels of which type of abuse compared to nonsexually victimized sexual abusers and nonsexually victimized delinquent youth?

A. Emotional abuse

B. Physical abuse

C. Sexual victimization

D. All of the above


8. Which of the following has an indirect effect on sexual coercion and has been found to be predictive of delinquent behaviors such as peer aggression and adolescent alcohol abuse?

A. Physical neglect

B. Physical abuse

C. Emotional abuse

D. All of the above


9. Which category of risk factors is consistent with path models that predict sexually abusive behavior toward peers and adults?

A. Greater hypersexuality or sexual deviance

B. More violent behavior or fantasies

C. An increased history of victimization

D. All of the above


10. There is strong evidence that sexual victimization plays a disproportionate role in the development of sexually abusive behavior in adolescents.

A. True

B. False


11. All of the following were found to be motivating factors for the majority of adolescents who sexually victimized peer or older females, except for:

A. Sexually deviant impulses.

B. Antisocial traits.

C. Alcohol and/or drugs.

D. All of the above were found to be motivating factors for the majority of adolescents who sexually victimized peer or older females.


12. Adolescents who target peers and adults are more likely to do all of the following, except for:

A. Select a female victim who was either a stranger or acquaintance.

B. Commit their offense in private and act alone.

C. Commit the sex crime in association with other criminal activity and be more aggressive and violent in commission of the offense.

D. Use a weapon.


13. It is suggested that adolescents who offend against peers have an inflated self-image and are arrogant and interpersonally exploitative.

A. True

B. False


Recidivism of Juveniles Who Commit Sexual Offenses

14. Research has found a significantly higher number of recidivism for juveniles who commit sexual offenses against peer or adult victims compared to those who commit sexual offenses against child victims.

A. True

B. False


15. Recidivism rates for juveniles who commit sexual offenses are generally higher than those observed for adult sexual offenders.

A. True

B. False


16. A relatively large percentage of juveniles who commit a sexual offense will sexually reoffend as adults.

A. True

B. False


Assessment of Risk for Sexual Reoffense in Juveniles Who Commit Sexual Offenses

17. Contemporary risk assessment focuses on risk factors associated with current behaviors, thoughts, feelings, attitudes, situations, interactions, and relationships, known as:

A. Dynamic risk factors

B. Static risk factors

C. Both (A) and (B)

D. None of the above


18. Although the measurement and evaluation of one or both types of risk factors is central to the risk assessment process, focusing on _____ is particularly important when treatment is provided because criminogenic needs provide targets for rehabilitative interventions.

A. Dynamic risk factors

B. Static risk factors

C. Both (A) and (B)

D. None of the above


19. Which assessment typically evaluates both static and dynamic risk factors, as well as protective factors that may decrease the risk for a sexual reoffense?

A. Actuarial assessment

B. Clinical risk assessment

C. Both (A) and (B)

D. None of the above


20. The exercise of unaided professional judgment by mental health practitioners is not considered a reliable or accurate means for assessing the potential for future dangerous behavior.

A. True

B. False


21. For which of the following reasons do neither actuarial nor clinical risk assessment instruments stand up to rigorous scientific scrutiny?

A. All current actuarial and clinical risk assessment instruments are insufficiently standardized.

B. All current actuarial and clinical risk assessment instruments lack inter-rater reliability.

C. All current actuarial and clinical risk assessment instruments generally fail to satisfy significant scientific standards.

D. All of the above.


22. Which of the following single risk factors, with relatively high predictive strength, is alone capable of predicting recidivism accurately?

A. History of sexual offending behavior

B. History of personal victimization

C. General psychosocial functioning

D. None of the above


23. Which of the following is the first actuarial risk assessment instrument available for use with juveniles who sexually offend?

A. J-SOAP-II.

B. ERASOR.

C. JSORRAT-II.

D. None of the above are actuarial risk assessment instruments available for use with juveniles who sexually offend.


24. Estimates of risk more than _____ into the future are unlikely to account sufficiently for the fluid nature of child and adolescent development.

A. 1 year

B. 1 to 2 years

C. 1 to 3 years

D. 1 to 5 years


Effectiveness of Treatment for Juveniles Who Sexually Offend

25. Juveniles who commit sexual offenses have more in common with adult sexual offenders than they do with other juvenile delinquents.

A. True

B. False


26. Many sexually offending youths desist from future offending even in the absence of intervention.

A. True

B. False


27. The weight of the available evidence suggests that treatment for juveniles who sexually offend can be effective.

A. True

B. False


28. All of the following treatment approaches are likely to be most effective, except for:

A. Those that are developmentally appropriate.

B. Those that focus on individual psychological deficits alone.

C. Those that take motivational and behavioral diversity into account.

D. Those that focus on family, peer, and other contextual correlates of sexually abusive behavior in youth.


29. Enhancement of behavior management skills in parents may be far less important in the treatment of sexually abusive behaviors in children than traditional clinical approaches.

A. True

B. False


Registration and Notification of Juveniles Who Commit Sexual Offenses

30. The goal of intervention with juveniles who commit sexual offenses is to:

A. Prevent recidivism

B. Decrease risk

C. Increase protective factors that buffer against reoffending

D. All of the above


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